Monday, October 08, 2007

Using Halo to Draw Teens...

Interesting article here in the NY Times about evangelical churches using Halo tournaments to draw teens to a place where they can hear the gospel. Not the first time we've had discussions about using all kinds of means to attract people to places where they can hear the gospel (read Christian haunted-houses, etc.) I mean, I'm all about using truth we find in culture as we point people to Jesus Christ (we just opened the last two weeks of our church services with a U2 and a Bon Jovi song, respectively), but isn't there a place where becoming "all things to all people" leads us to places we don't really want to go. Any thoughts?

4 comments:

Tristam29 said...

There's always a line like that. Church can't be everything to everyone, but Christians cannot stop using effective evangelistic techniques based on even minor or potential moral quandaries. In short, God has bigger fish to fry than whether some kid plays Halo when that same kid hasn't accepted Jesus.

God *has* to be a little Machiavellian simply because he's perfect and we (his evangelizers) are not. No matter how perfect we attempt to make our techniques, we will fail. Thus, the ends justify the means to some extent.

God doesn't like the lukewarm, which tells me that so long as your evangelistic technique doesn't scream to your soul as being outright immoral, then you need to take action. Use Halo tournaments. Get people who would otherwise not know or talk about God to begin to question. That is the nature of seed planting.

Tristam29 said...

This story just got picked up by Slashdot. As a former engineer, have you struggled in dealing with the common religious views of other engineers? How prevalent do you think that these opinions are? (i.e. Do you think Slashdot is a vocal minority or accurately representative of the culture?) What advice would you give to Christians dealing with this culture on a daily basis?

Brent said...

I think the best thing about using Halo (for teens) is that the line is being blurred between "church" life and "real" life...and churches are finally starting to realize that life is life. There isn't a "church" life and a "business/school" life.

Ultimately it'll come down to how you define the role of the Christian within the culture and how to engage the culture. Sure, some things will wind up failing and some things will offend and you'll decide not to do them for a myriad of reasons...

...but more power to trying.

I mean, we-as a church--use Super Bowls and coffee shops and movie clips and all sorts of stuff to build relationships, and this seems like a teen method that easily 80% of our male students play anyway--to use it does keep kids sticking around long enough. Now the trick is to turn that into serious evanglism and/or growth.

Tristam29 said...

Actually, having looked at the comments on that particular Slashdot story, they seem relatively calm compared to others. That is probably a better example for my questions.